Skin Diseases

Top 3 Infectious Diseases of the Skin:

Mentioned below these three Infectious Diseases:

Atopic Dermatitis
Seborrheic Dermatitis (SD)
Psoriasis

Atopic Dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis occurs in people with a low natural level of resistance to itching. The resistance level of the bite is determined genetically. One factor in this disorder may be immunodeficiency. Atopic dermatitis usually begins in childhood. It is common in the Western Hemisphere and is associated with a family history of asthma or hay fever. Wounds are mainly produced by scratching. With severe scratching, the lesions begin to become red, weeping, and growing. Ulcers usually occur in the neck, behind the knee, and inside the arm at the elbow. Factors that increase (worse) dermatitis include sudden changes in weather, stress, hair loss, hair loss, and irritating chemicals. People suffering from atopic dermatitis should avoid things that cause or exacerbate the condition. Treatment usually includes topical agents such as corticosteroids, anti-infectives, or UV therapy.

Seborrheic Dermatitis (SD)

The disease is most commonly seen in areas of the body with abundant sebaceous glands (oil), such as the head and eyebrows. It appears to be a rapid, immature epidermal growth (layer of outer skin). Its non-swollen counterpart is dyed. SD is one of the skin symptoms associated with HIV infection. Infantile SD (diaper rash) usually occurs in the first three months after birth. Infant SD does not appear to cause itching. SD sores in infants respond to high-dose corticosteroids. Some ointments contain an insecticide and prevent fungal infections. The fungus appears to play a role in the inflammation of the SD. SD is treated with special shampoos and topical corticosteroids or antifungal agents.

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a common, incurable, hereditary disease. It contains high pink or red sores that look like silver scales. Wounds may be small individual points or large spots covered. Ancient areas of sores on the scalp, knees, elbows, umbilicus (abdomen button), and sacral area – the area below the spine, between the hipbones. Psoriasis may be accompanied by joint pain. Psoriasis is probably, at least in part, an autoimmune disorder (in which the immune system falsely identifies certain parts of the body as “external”). Risk factors that indicate a higher risk of developing psoriasis include depression, infection, specific medications, immunologic (HIV) traits, and family history. There is some connection with arthritis. Topical treatment is preferred when less than 20% of the body is involved. Medications used to treat this condition include corticosteroids, coal tar, salicylic acid, which are derived from Vitamin D, etretinate, methotrexate, and cyclosporine.

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