Skin Diseases

The Five Most Common Skin Diseases

Listed below are five of the most common skin diseases

Chicken Pox (Varicella)
Herpes Zoster
Warts
Rubeola (Measles)
Rubella (German measles)

Chicken Pox (Varicella)

The disease is caused by the herpes zoster virus. Chickenpox is a highly contagious, airborne virus. It affects children far more often than adults. The incubation period is 10-20 days. Common symptoms include fever, headache, anorexia, malaise, and ulcers. The lesions appear as small, pink, raised areas surrounded by a red halo. Treatment includes keeping the wounds dry and eliminating itching to prevent people from cracking open sores and spreading the virus. Often, ulcers do not cause significant scars. Sometimes a small pock-mark can be left behind after a wound injury.

Herpes Zoster

These are often called shingles and occur mostly in the elderly. This serious disease occurs when the sleeping virus (Varicella) starts to work. The active virus produces severe itching, pain, and vesicles collected along the unilateral dermatome (a common area associated with a specific nerve). The virus remains to lie next to the nerve endings and is thought to migrate upwards during operation. The vesicles usually rupture and clear in about 2-3 weeks. Several antiviral drugs can be used to reduce the duration of infection

Warts

Warts are raised, a well-defined growth with an unusual gray area. Warts that appear on the hands are called verruca Vulgaris or normal warts. The human wart virus is transmitted through direct contact but is probably auto-injected with razor blades, for example. Warts almost always recur automatically but are sometimes removed by freezing, using topical salicylic acid, or OTC warts removal methods. The Verruca plant tends to grow on the soles of the feet. Whips on the feet hurt from the irritation of the walk. These warts usually grow inside. Condylomata alumina has large, pink, or purple sores found mainly in warm, moist areas or genitals. Although commonly known as venereal warts, they do not occur through sexual contact.

Rubeola (Measles)

The disease usually begins with fever, sickness, and flu symptoms. This phase lasts approximately 24 hours. This first stage is followed by the second stage, which lasts 4-7 days, and causes fever, chills, headache, photophobia, and a dry cough. Measles sores start as small bumps on the back of the mouth or (excessively) behind the ears for about 3 to 7 days. The spots then appear on the face, arms, and chest. The virus is transmitted through direct contact with the infected nasal and throat tissues of an infected person. Treatment is symptomatic. Vaccination is available for prevention and is often required to attend school.

Rubella (German measles)

Rubella is a highly contagious viral disease that is transmitted through contact with the mouth or oral tissues of an infected person. It causes mild fever and malaise (feeling uncomfortable in the body) about 4-5 days before sores appear. Sores appear as small, abnormal, pink spots or bumps that usually appear on the face before spreading throughout the body. These sores disappear within 2-3 days. The vaccine is very effective and is usually given to children at the same time as the rubella vaccine. Immunization of women after childbirth is avoided if the pregnancy is confirmed or suspected. Pregnancy should be avoided for the first three months after vaccination. Rubella is especially dangerous for pregnant women. The virus can cross the placenta and infect the fetus, leading to serious birth defects.

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